Food and Behaviour Research

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Food and Behaviour Research

Nutrition can play an important role in behaviour, learning and mood. Scientific evidence shows that diet is important not only for physical health, but also for optimal mental development and functioning.

The FAB website offers information on a wide range of conditions such as ADHD, autism, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression and many other physical and mental issues.

The site presents clear and reliable information on the latest research for people who are interested in its practical applications.

As well as our own published papers and factsheets, we regularly trawl through the scientific press to bring you up to date information on the subject of nutrition and behavioural disorders.

FAB Research also aims to promote, support and carry out further scientific research in this area.

Latest News and Events

Link between autism and eating disorders may be due to an inability to identify emotions – new research

  • 06 Aug 2020

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rates of any mental illness. They don’t discriminate, affecting people of all ethnicities, sexualities, gender identities, ages and backgrounds. However, one group is disproportionately affected by these disorders: people on the autism spectrum.

Gut bacteria in people with Huntington's disease may be a potential drug target

  • 06 Aug 2020

A world first clinical study of the gut microbiome in people with Huntington's disease (HD) has found that it is not just a disease of the brain, but also of the body. The study, led by Monash University's Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, with collaboration from the Florey Institute for Neurosciences found evidence of gut dysbiosis (altered bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract) in people with HD, with some of the gut measures associated with disease symptoms, such as impaired movements and thinking.

REM sleep tunes eating behaviour

  • 06 Aug 2020

Despite our broad understanding of the different brain regions activated during rapid-eye-movement sleep, little is known about what this activity serves for. Researchers at the University of Bern and the Inselspital have now discovered that the activation of neurons in the hypothalamus during REM sleep regulates eating behavior: suppressing this activity in mice decreases appetite.

Why diet is the key to kids' mental health

Children school lunch: photo by Amanda Mills

How does what children eat affect how they behave?

Check out the evidence

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Whatever your age, having a healthy brain is the key to a happy and fulfilled life. Yet, for both young and old, diseases of the brain and mental health are the biggest killers in the 21st century...

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Can diet impact age-related dementia?

Healthy ageing

Is diet the key to minimising age-related mental health problems?

Check out the evidence