Food and Behaviour Research

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Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

Wilkinson MJ, Manoogian ENC, Zadourian A, Lo H, Fakhouri S, Shoghi A, Wang X, Fleischer JG, Navlakha S, Panda S, Taub PR (2019) Cell Metab. 2019 Dec;  doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004 

Web URL: Read the research on cell.com

Abstract:

In animal models, time-restricted feeding (TRF) can prevent and reverse aspects of metabolic diseases. Time-restricted eating (TRE) in human pilot studies reduces the risks of metabolic diseases in otherwise healthy individuals. However, patients with diagnosed metabolic syndrome often undergo pharmacotherapy, and it has never been tested whether TRE can act synergistically with pharmacotherapy in animal models or humans. In a single-arm, paired-sample trial, 19 participants with metabolic syndrome and a baseline mean daily eating window of ≥14 h, the majority of whom were on a statin and/or antihypertensive therapy, underwent 10 h of TRE (all dietary intake within a consistent self-selected 10 h window) for 12 weeks. We found this TRE intervention improves cardiometabolic health for patients with metabolic syndrome receiving standard medical care including high rates of statin and anti-hypertensive use. TRE is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome.

Context and Significance

People with metabolic syndrome are at risk for diabetes and heart disease. Current treatment requires weight loss and lifestyle changes that are challenging; thus, new behavioral interventions are needed. Ten-hour time-restricted eating (TRE) limits daily dietary intake to a consistent 10-h window, creating a 14-h nightly fast. Researchers studied whether TRE for 12 weeks in people with metabolic syndrome receiving standard medical care (including medications to lower cholesterol and blood pressure) improves markers of health. TRE led to weight loss, healthier body composition (including decreased waist circumference), lower blood pressure and levels of cardiovascular disease-promoting lipids (i.e., “bad cholesterol” levels), and more restful sleep. TRE could be an effective dietary intervention to help those with metabolic syndrome.

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