Food and Behaviour Research

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10 June 2014 - MedicalXpress - Lead abatement a wise economic, public health investment

Laurel Thomas Gnagey

Childhood lead exposure costs Michigan residents an estimated $330 million annually, and a statewide remediation program to eliminate the source of most lead poisoning would pay for itself in three years, according to a new report.

FAB RESEARCH COMMENT:

See also: 21 April 2014 - BBC News - Did removing lead from petrol spark a decline in crime?

One of the researchers interviewed for this BBC news article was Dr Bernard Gesch - a Senior Research Scientist at the University Lab of Physiology, Oxford, and Founder of the research charity Natural Justice, which he set up to investigate causes of criminal antisocial behaviour - including lead.  

One of the people who helped Bernard significantly in this work was the late Professor Derek Bryce-Smyth - who pioneered the recognition of lead's neurotoxicity, and the drive to ban lead from petrol.

Dr. Bernard Gesch spoke at the Food and Behaviour Research event in London 

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"Economic Impacts of Lead Exposure and Remediation in Michigan," compares the cost of four well-documented impacts of lead exposure—increased health care, increased crime, increase in special education, and decline in lifetime earnings—with the cost of lead abatement of high-risk homes.

The report is a collaboration between the University of Michigan Risk Science Center in the School of Public Health and the Michigan Network for Children's Environmental Health.

With 70 percent of lead exposure associated with lead-based paint, the researchers estimate that it would require an investment of $600 million to remediate the 100,000 high-risk housing units in Michigan–-an outlay that would pay for itself after three years when compared with the ongoing costs associated with exposure.

"This scenario suggests that each dollar invested in abatement would return approximately $2.80 in net cost savings over 10 years, $6.60 after 20 years, and after three decades the returns will increase tenfold to $10.50, and these benefits would continue for many years to come," said Tracy Swinburn, research specialist at the U-M Risk Science Center and author of the report. "These substantial economic returns are all in addition to improved health outcomes for thousands of Michigan children whose lead exposure could be avoided."

Of the four impacts of lead exposure considered in the report, decreases in lifetime earnings due to lead-associated IQ loss are the most costly, with an estimated annual loss of $206 million. Costs associated with increases in crime, health care and special education are $105 million, $18 million, $2.5 million, respectively.

"It is well-documented that childhood lead exposure is associated with a wide range of irreversible and costly health effects and behavioral problems. However, this is the first time these impacts of lead exposure have been compared with the costs of abatement in Michigan," Swinburn said.